Get ready to renew your Medicaid coverage.

Make sure your contact information is up to date, check your mail for a letter and complete your renewal form (if you get one).
Piedmont Medical Center is not offering outpatient COVID-19 testing at this time. If you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms to include fever, cough, or shortness of breath, and need treatment for COVID-19 or any other medical emergencies, we are able to evaluate you at our Emergency Department in Rock Hill or Fort Mill. If you are not having any symptoms and are seeking outpatient COVID-19 testing ONLY, please refer to the DHEC websitefor updated information on testing sites within the state.

Emergency Room Online Check-in

Choose your arrival time at a location near you and wait in the comfort of your own home.

{{ Facility.address }}

No times available.

About Piedmont Medical Center

Established in 1983, our 288-bed full service hospital serves the residents of York County and beyond. As your premier healthcare system, we are committed to ensuring that all patients have access to the highest quality of care. Through innovative programs, collaborations and technological advances, we continuously expand our scope of services to meet the needs of our growing community. We’ve been recognized for our growth and leadership, and we’re very proud of the numerous accolades and designations we have received from our industry.

Learn what makes us a Community Built on Care

News & Announcements

How to Prevent the Flu

Oct 4, 2016

It’s nice to give gifts to family members and friends. But there is one “gift” that is best not given to others, although it is sometimes unwittingly passed along – the flu.

     PMC Flu Prevention Cover Your Mouth      

 

Influenza, also known as the flu, is a contagious virus that can cause severe illness and even life-threatening complications. Flu viruses can cause high fever, headache, fatigue, dry cough, sore throat, runny nose, and body aches. Complications may include bacterial pneumonia, dehydration, and aggravation of chronic medical conditions, such as congestive heart failure, asthma or diabetes. The flu spreads when an infected person coughs, sneezes or speaks, and the virus goes into the air and other people inhale it.

Every year, between five and 20 percent of Americans get sick from the flu. Most recover in one to two weeks, but approximately 200,000 people end up being hospitalized for flu-related complications. Those most likely to develop flu complications are children between the ages of six months and 19 years of age, adults age 50 and older, women who are pregnant during flu season, individuals living in nursing homes or long-term-care facilities, people with chronic health conditions, health care workers who have direct patient contact, and care givers of children less than six months old.

The best way to prevent passing the flu along to your loved ones and others is to get an annual flu shot. The flu vaccine protects against the three viruses that are expected to be the most common each year and usually becomes available in the fall. It may be given either as a shot or nasal spray, depending on the person’s age and any existing health conditions. You also can prevent the spread of the flu by avoiding close contact with people who are sick. If you are the one who is sick, try to keep your distance so others won’t get the flu too. You also should stay home, if possible, from work or school. 

 

 

 

PMC Fight the Flu - Get Vaccinated

Good health habits are especially important during flu season, which typically lasts from about October through February. Remember to cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and then wash your hands often to protect against germs. Use an alcohol-based sanitizer if soap and water are not available. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth since germs are often spread when you lay a hand on something that is contaminated with the flu virus and then touch yourself.  Try to get plenty of sleep, stay active, manage stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy foods so your immune system stays strong.

The flu is one thing that is best not shared with others. If you do get it, antiviral drugs may be taken to help make the illness milder and shorten the length of time you are sick.  

 

Flu flyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quick Links